Chaos Theory, Meteorology, Navier-Stokes, Wolfram (Hiking in Modern Math 5/7)

By Lê Nguyên Hoang, Not an Ordinary Seminar, GERAD.

For one hour, I will take you through some of the most amazing recent subfields of mathematics. From computational theory to chaos theory, from infinity to ergodicity, from mathematical physics to category theory, we will be unveiling mind-blowing results of modern mathematics. Although primarily aimed at non-mathematicians, it should be of great interest to everyone.

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